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Energy and Resource Security

494_energy_securityThe quest for long-term energy supplies is becoming a matter of increasing regional competition with secure access to oil and gas a matter of national strategic consideration. Energy-hungry economies in East and South Asia are highly dependent on imported oil and gas to fuel economic growth and are acting to secure long-term energy supplies. However, the environmental challenges related to climate change and human security, as well as rising energy costs, have affected how these Asian governments regard the use of conventional hydrocarbon energy resources. Meanwhile, Russia and the Central Asian states have a significant proportion of the world's primary energy resources and are looking for ways to increase such exports to expand and diversify into new markets in Asia and Europe.

Energy policy deserves particular attention because a better grasp of the energy security rationale of the various Asian actors would enable us to better understand Asia's regional and sub-regional political dynamics. This project analyzes the foreign and security implications resulting from the energy strategies of the various import and export governments. For import countries, energy security traditionally refers to the availability of energy at all times, in various forms, in sufficient quantities, and at affordable prices. For export countries, energy security traditionally translates into the certainty of market demand in terms of quantity at predictable prices. This project also examines, within the theoretical and policy contexts, the extent to which this ever-growing regional concern could create opportunities for greater bilateral and multilateral cooperation and common benefit. Such developments could create permanent relations of mutual engagement and cooperative interdependence, and help mitigate the potential of conflict in this region.

The value of this research lies in the potential application of the research findings in promoting regional stability through multilateral cooperation at a time when countries are facing growing energy scarcity in the face of increasing and competing energy demands. The project would tap the opinions of scholars and policy-makers from the Central, South, and Northeast and Southeast sub-regions in order to produce recommendations that would be politically acceptable and of practical application.

The Institute for Security and Development Policy, which is based in Northern Europe, is in an exceptional position to conduct such research because it is perceived to be a non-threatening outsider for Asian governments. It is therefore able to create a neutral and conducive environment and attract illustrious scholars and policy-makers from these regions to engage and collaborate on the issue of energy security in a constructive manner.

On a general level, the result of this research also has wide appeal outside conflict management circles because of its implications on the environment, economic, social and security concerns which are of academic, political and commercial interest.

The main issues explored are:

  • The uncertainties related to energy supplies for energy importing countries
  • The interaction between exporting and importing countries, and the rivalry between importing states for supplies
  • Attitudes and strategies of governments towards renewable energy and sustainable development
  • The possibility of transforming an issue that could potentially cause friction into one of opportunity for multilateral cooperation and common benefit.

Energy and Security in Asia PDF Print Email
Projects

Energy-hungry Asian economies are highly dependent on imported oil and gas to fuel economic growth. However, the environmental challenges related to climate change and human security, as well as rising energy costs concerns, have affected how Asian governments regard the use of conventional hydrocarbon energy resources. Meanwhile, Russia and the Central Asian states have a significant proportion of the world's primary energy resources and are looking for ways to increase such exports to expand and diversify into new markets in Asia and Europe. This project analyzes the foreign and security implications resulting from the energy strategies of the various import and export governments. It also examines, within the theoretical and policy contexts, the extent to which this ever-growing regional concern could create opportunities for greater bilateral and multilateral cooperation and common benefit. Such developments could create permanent relations of mutual engagement and cooperative interdependence, and help mitigate the potential of conflict in this region.

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Publications on Energy and Resource Security

Elliot Brennan
The New Prize: Asia’s “Fire Ice” Gas Revolution
COMMENTARY, The Diplomat, May 11, 2013 Webpage Link
Elliot Brennan
The “Fracking” Revolution Comes to China
ANALYSIS, The Diplomat, March 21, 2013 Webpage Link
Elliot Brennan
Shale Gas: The Key in the US’ Asia Pivot? (republished)
COMMENTARY, China US Focus, March 08, 2013 Webpage Link
Elliot Brennan
Shale Gas: The Key in the US’ Asia Pivot?
POLICY BRIEF, No. 115, February 27, 2013 Webpage Link
Elliot Brennan, Jeremy Arthur
The End of Japan’s Nuclear Renaissance? Not Just Yet.
POLICY BRIEF, No. 94, May 16, 2012 Webpage Link
Nazery Khalid
A New Divide in the South China Sea
POLICY BRIEF, No. 92, April 18, 2012, pp. 4 Webpage Link
Elliot Brennan
The South China Sea: Resetting the Chessboard (in Chinese)
COMMENTARY, Thinktank Observer, March 2012 Webpage Link
Frances G. Burwell, Svante Cornell
The Transatlantic Partnership and Relations with Russia
BOOK, in The Transatlantic Partnership and Relations with Russia, March 2012, pp. 134 Webpage Link
Elliot Brennan
The South China Sea: Resetting the Chessboard
POLICY BRIEF, No. 88, February 22, 2012 Webpage Link
Christopher O´ Hara, Niels Selling
Myanmar’s Ethnic Insurgents: UWSA, KNU and KIO
ASIA PAPER, February 2012, pp. 55 Webpage Link
Elliot Brennan, Bert Edström
Rare Earth Elements: The Next Oil
ISDP POLICY BRIEF, No. 78, October 19, 2011 Webpage Link
Christopher O´ Hara, David Nises
Myanmar: Eastern Clout & Western Absence
ISDP POLICY BRIEF, No. 76, September 28, 2011 Webpage Link
Christopher Len
Rethinking Nuclear Power in Asia after Fukushima
COMMENTARY, East Asia Forum, March 25, 2011 Webpage Link
Niklas Swanström
Book review: Thrassy N. Marketos, China’s Energy Geopolitics: The Shanghai Cooperation Organization and Central Asia
JOURNAL ARTICLE, China Information, Volume 24, No. 2, July 2010
Klas Marklund
Indonesia: Development Scenarios 2020–2030
ASIA PAPER, September 2009 Webpage Link
Christopher Len and Alvin Chew (ed.)
Energy and Security Cooperation in Asia: Challenges and Prospects
BOOK, July 2009, pp. 341 Webpage Link
Ingolf Kiesow
The Changing Nature of the Race for Oil
BOOK CHAPTER, in Security and Development in Asia: New Threats and Challenges in the Post-Postwar Era, June 2009 Webpage Link

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